The Kabul times, Afghanistan Trustable News Agency.
Articles

Increasing poverty forces more children into child labor in Afghanistan

The 2023 World Day Against Child Labor is, therefore, considered to be a moment for
all who are committed to ending child labor to demonstrate that change can be achieved
when will and determination come together and provide momentum for efforts to be
accelerated in a situation of great urgency

Observed on June 12th, World Day Against Child Labor is intended to serve as a catalyst for the growing worldwide movement against child labor. Emphasizing the link between social justice and child labor, the slogan for the World Day in 2023 is ‘Social Justice for All. End Child Labor.’ Experience in tackling child labor over the course of the last three decades has demonstrated that child labor can be eliminated if the root causes are addressed. More than ever, it is urgent for all to contribute to bringing solutions to people’s daily problems, and child labor is – possibly – the most visible of these problems. The 2023 World Day Against Child Labor is, therefore, considered to be a moment for all who are committed to ending child labor to demonstrate that change can be achieved when will and deter mination come together and provide momentum for efforts to be accelerated in a situation of great urgency. In the course of nearly two decades, the world had been making steady progress in reducing child labor. But over the past few years, conflicts, crises and the COVID-19 pandemic have plunged more families into poverty – and forced millions more children into child labor. Economic growth has not been sufficient, nor inclusive enough, to relieve the pressure that too many families and communities feel and that makes them resort to child labor. Today, 160 million children are still engaged in child labor. That is almost one in ten children worldwide. While the percentage of children in child labor is highest in low-income countries, their numbers are actually greater in middle-income countries. 9 percent of all children in lower-middle-income countries, and 7 percent of all children in upper-middle-income countries, are in child labor. Statistics on the absolute number of children in child labor in each national income grouping indicate that 84 million children in child labor, accounting for 56 percent of all those in child labor, actually live in middle-income countries and an additional 2 million live in high-income countries. In Afghanistan, with increasing poverty, the number of children in child labor has increased considerably as households use every available means to survive. Most Afghan children have turned to hard work as work in blacksmithing, mining, car-repairing workshop, construction and others. Poverty in the country has forced thousands of children to work on the streets. Many families have no other choice, except making their children in child labor to survive. Based on the latest figures provided by Save the Children, an international organization for supporting the children, 1 million Afghan children were in child labor across the country last year. The number of children in child labor might have increased in the past one year due to increasing poverty in the country. It is time that international organizations supporting children need to work closely with the Islamic Emirate to find ways to eliminate child labor in the country. It is time that the international community should remove all sanctions and release the country’s foreign assets. Mohammad Daud

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The Kabul times, Afghanistan Trustable News Agency.