The Kabul times, Afghanistan Trustable News Agency.
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Climate change reducing access to water in Afghanistan

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA) has said that climate change is reducing access to water across Afghanistan. OCHA Afghanistan in a tweet has said that the proportion of households experiencing water shortages rose from 48 percent in 2021 to 60 percent in 2022. The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs has said that some $479.4 million is needed to accelerate change and solve the water and sanitation crisis in the country during 2023. “Climate change is reducing access to water across Afghanistan. the proportion of households experiencing water shortages rose from 48% in 2021 to 60% in 2022. In 2023, some $479.4M is needed to accelerate change in solve the water & sanitation crisis,” OCHA tweeted. Meanwhile, in recent days, the European Union delegation in Afghanistan has said that Afghanistan is the 4th most at-risk country from humanitarian crises and disasters. The EU Delegation to Afghanistan said in its most recent statement that the delegation hosted a meeting on climate change in Afghanistan. The statement added that the meeting has been chaired by Raffaella Iodice, Chargée d’Affaires a.i. to Afghanistan, and Melinda Good, World Bank Country Director Afghanistan, with EU Special Envoy to Afghanistan Tomas Niklasson attending. The discussed risks facing Afghanistan from the point of climate change as well as the consequences of climate change which have the potential to unleash a level of destruction on Afghan society that is comparable to the devastation wrought by the decades of war. According to the statement, with several severe droughts over the last decade alone, the impact of climate change is already having a disastrous impact on the lives of the Afghan people. Therefore, all feel that there is an urgency for relevant organizations to take these signs seriously and to take action. Climate change is a major risk to good development outcomes, and the World Bank Group is committed to playing an important role in helping countries integrate climate action into their core development agendas. The World Bank Group (WBG) and the Asian Development Bank (ADB) are committed to supporting client countries to invest in and build a low-carbon, climate resilient future, helping them to be better prepared to adapt to current and future climate impacts. Both institutions are investing in incorporating and systematically managing climate risks in development operations through their individual corporate commitments. Afghanistan faces rates of warming higher than the global average with a potential rise of 1.4°C–5.4°C by the 2080s and the 2090s, compared with the baseline of 1986–2005. The range in possible temperature rises highlights the significant differences between 21st century emissions pathways. Ahmad Mukhtar

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The Kabul times, Afghanistan Trustable News Agency.